The Olympics are Over. Swimming is Not.

The Olympics may be over but you can bet swimming is not. Since it seems like everyone immediately goes from swimming fanatic to forgetting the sport exists the night of the closing ceremonies, I decided to put together a few reasons why swimming should be watched all the time, not just on a once every four years basis. Check it out here!

Advertisements

Swim Kick Sets You Won’t Hate

In life, there are always things we despise, but that must endure in order to be better at what we do like. Swim kicks are one of those things. Often the bane of many a swimmer’s existence, it is nonetheless recommended, mandatory even, that we complete them in order to get stronger, faster, and better. That said, I stumbled across this blog post that makes swim kicks—bearable? I don’t know, they’re better than usual at least. Check it out!

Water, Water Everywhere

This wonderful article details the benefits of why we should all learn to swim. Not teaching your children to swim can cause some very real, very tragic consequences that are often-times entirely avoidable. Check it out here.

Water News

At times, it can be difficult to stay-up-date with the latest news in the swimming world. Its rapid development and increasing popularity ensure events are constantly emerging, records are constantly being broken, and legends are constantly in the making. Lately, I’ve found this site to be quite helpful so that I can “stay in the know.” Check it out!

Navy Veteran Brad Snyder Shatters Two American Records

Recently Brad Snyder, a United States Navy veteran, shattered records at the ECAC Swimming Championships. Brad broke his own record in the 100-yard freestyle with a time of 53.12. He first set the record back in 2014 with a time of 55.59. It was followed by a new American record in the 100 yard backstroke with a time of 1:03. The previous record had been 8 seconds longer.

Mr. Snyder sets two new records within his S11 categories. S11 is a category used within the Paralympics. Anyone who swims under this category denotes that they are severely visually impaired or blind. Swimmers are required to wear black out goggles and receive a tap on the shoulder as they approach the wall.

Snyder is an inspiration for his fellow Paralympic athletes, and to all Americans. After graduating from the Naval Academy in 2006, he proudly served his country as an explosive ordnance disposal officer. It was in 2011 during a tour in Afghanistan that Brad lost his eyesight after stepping on an IED while trying to help the victims of a separate bombing. As a true hero, Brad was in the water less than a year later competing for a spot on the US Paralympic Team. Fate granted him that wish and he quickly became one of the world’s fastest blind swimmers, taking home two gold medals and a silver.

The competition was held on the first weekend of the month at the US Naval Academy, which is located in Annapolis, Maryland. ECAC stands for the Eastern College Athletic Competition and includes team such as the University of Virginia, Army West Point, and the Naval Academy. For the first time in competition the ECAC launched it’s Inclusive Sports Initiative. It allows Paralympic athletes to score at meets and it blew expectations out of the water. Brad was not the only one who set records – in fact, there were 8 others.

Speaking to Swimming World, Brad released a statement showcasing his pride and approval of the inclusion initiative;  “I’m immensely proud and excited about the ECAC inclusion initiative! I was honored to compete in the exhibition and I’m looking forward to seeing how the “disability” category is integrated next year. It is my most sincere hope that this inclusion initiative will serve as a model for other conferences to follow in the future. I think this is a win-win for all those involved.”

I salute Brad for his service to our country and for being a great American!